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What Is a "Debt Collector?"

and When Are You being Sued by One?

 

There is a tremendous amount of confusion of who is a "debt collector" within the meaning of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and when you're being sued by one. People will tell me that they are "being sued by a debt collector, but the name on the suit is Capital One," for example. They think that because the lawyer signs the pleadings, or a lawfirm shows up in court, that it is the lawyer who is suing them.

And in a very limited sense - but only in a limited sense - that is correct. For most purposes, the entity suing them is the one named as "plaintiff."

Lawyers who Regularly Collect Debts Are Debt Collectors


The lawyer and law firm representing the company suing you are probably debt collectors within the meaning of the FDCPA. That means that their personal actions may bring them within the law, but it isn't always clear when they will, though. It appears that if the pleading asks for something, the lawyer signing it will be liable (on the hook) personally (and his or her lawfirm, also) for the violation. But the company won't always be liable for the actions of the lawyer - its agent - as would normally be the case for most things.

If the company was an original creditor, and the lawyer threatened you with suit, and you sought verification of the debt, would the company be unable to sue you using the same lawyer? Not likely. Because the company - not a debt collector - has no obligations to you under the FDCPA, and that's where the right to verification comes from. If you filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit based on the company's failure to verify the debt, it should be denied.

The Name on the Lawsuit Is the Important Name


If your lawsuit says "Cap One vs. You," you are being sued by an original creditor and not a debt collector. They don't have to play by the rules that apply to debt collectors. That means they don't have to verify the debt, and they can do some of the things debt collectors are not allowed to do. You need to direct you Answer, Defenses, and any Counterclaims with the awareness that the other party is the original creditor and not a debt collector. It means, for example, that they needn't verify the debt before or after suit, and that an attack by you on the ownership of the debt is not going to work - their name is on the debt. There's no "chain of title" issue where title has never passed to another company.

But how they act when they sue you may bring the lawyers within the FDCPA.

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