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Should You Give the Debt Collector Money? And What Happens if You Do?

Debt collectors are trained to be intimidating and aggressive. Should you ever give them money? and what are the legal effects if you do so? Giving them money can be a big mistake. Watch and see why.

For help defending yourself, I recommend the Debt Defense System. If you are trying to negotiate and settle before litigation (and you don't think they're about to sue you), try our Debt Negotiation System.

 

 

Should I talk to a Debt Collector? What Should I Say to Collections?

If you are being called or harassed by a debt collector, one of the purposes of that debt collector is to get you to talk. Should you? This is going to depend on whether you have anything to say.

Debt Collectors Target Struggling People

As I have mentioned before, the debt collection business is targeted at distressed people. The debt collectors already know you don't have much money, and they know you probably have other people trying to get money from you. Their job is not to force you to pay somebody—it's to force you to pay them. Another way to put that is that they are not competing with you—they're competing with other debt collectors. You are the football in a game between the debt collectors, the string in a game of tug of war. Does that make sense?

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Silence Can Be Golden when Dealing with Collections

The job of the debt collector is to get you to pay them instead of someone else. They can do this either by annoying you so much that you pay them to get them off the phone or by establishing a sympathetic connection to you so you gladly do it for the voice on the other end of the line. Both of these methods involve keeping you on the phone and the connection open, and neither of these methods is directed at your well-being. Also, if they can get you to reveal information about your job or bank, or any kind of assets you have, they can improve their chances of making you pay against your will. So unless you have your own purpose for communicating, you shouldn't do it.

Sometimes it Makes Sense to Talk to Collectors

What might be a good reason for you to communicate? Well, because you want something tangible from the debt collector to whom you are speaking. You could want them to reduce interest rates, waive penalties, agree not to give information on your debt to the credit reporting agencies, or any number of actual, materially beneficial things. If you're hoping to get a friendly voice or understanding, a debt collector is the wrong person to talk to: they already understand everything they want to know about your situation. Talk to someone else for that.

Negotiate—And Get It in Writing

Don't be afraid to negotiate. You can ask for anything from them, and in most cases the debt collector could give you anything you might request. So be bold. If you want to settle for ten cents on the dollar, you can ask. They may laugh—but laughter is just a part of the negotiation and doesn't mean they won't do it. And if they agree to do anything, you must get the agreement in writing. In a practical sense, it doesn't count if you don't get it in writing. You won't be able to prove it, and in some cases an oral “modification” would not even be legally recognizable even if you could prove it. It must be in writing.

They'll want something in return. An immediate payment, an agreement to pay by a certain date, something. You can agree to this if you can do it, but you're spinning your wheels if you cannot, so it makes sense to limit your promises to things you're sure you can perform. Don't over-commit, as this may negate the agreement you reach and will almost certainly increase the number and hostility of the phone calls you are receiving. Remember that the debt collector is keeping records of everything you say (so don't tell them where you work or bank).

Stop Talking to Collectors When You've Said What You Need to Say

And when you run out of reasons to keep talking to the debt collector, make sure that you actually stop talking to them. There is always a price for anything you say - you're giving them free information that they will use to decide to sue you. Sometimes talking to them is worth that price, but if that changes, you should feel no obligation to keep talking.

If You Are Already Being Sued

 

       If you are already being sued, you probably should not sign up for the course and wait for anything. You need action now. You should be doing things to protect yourself NOW. You can beat them - it's mostly a question of knowing what you need to do and doing that thing throughout the lawsuit, while at the same time not doing the things you should not do, until you either make them go away or win at trial. It sounds simple, and it is – if you know what you’re doing.  You can no those things with the Debt Defense System and get help doing the right things while avoiding the worng ones. 

     I have had a great deal of experience both as a litigator and web master and have realized that almost every person representing himself or herself in a debt case would do much better if (1) they have an opportunity, preferably on a regular basis, to talk to other people who can help them with insights and information; and (2) a lot of the work done for them. The Debt Defense System does that. When you buy the Debt Defense System, you will also get a membership which both allows you to use the full resources of Your Legal Leg Up's website and participate in our weekly teleconferences where members speak to each other and Your Legal Leg Up's staff.

          Just think about how it will be, first when you walk away from the debt collectors who have been making your life miserable, and then as you move towards a life of greater freedom and happiness – free from debt, and free to build your future.

         The Debt Defense System is a service designed to give you all the materials and support you will need to defend yourself from either the debt collectors or original creditors without having to hire a lawyer.

If You Are Not Already Being Sued


     If you are not already being sued, and want to try to negotiate with the debt collectors or creditors to clear up your credit report or make sure they do not sue you, then you will want our Debt Negotiation System

     Not all negotiation and settlement happens in court, you know. It is possible to contact many creditors and debt collectors to work things out without a law suit. But - whether there is a lawsuit or not, all negotiations occur "within the shadow of the law." That is, in order to negotiate effectively, you need to know what their rights are, and what your rights are, in the law. What can they do to you if you do not settle? And what can you do to them? Knowing the answers to these questions helps you handle the fear and uncertainty that haunts so many people as they try to get a grip on their financial lives. You can find the answers you need.

     And after you find the answers that lie behind the debts, you still need to know what to say and how to say it. You'll find plenty of help with that, too. You see, it makes a large difference who you're talking to and where in the debt collection process you are. We do not offer empty formulas, but rather solid understanding of what they are after, what you might want or get... and a few suggestions about how to say things so you'll get them.

     Click here for more information on the Debt Negotiation System.

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